Dreamcatcher Sleepwear: Warding Off Bad Dreams with Style

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Dreamcatcher Sleepwear: Warding Off Bad Dreams with Style

 

A little bit of effort goes a long way, as the saying goes. Sleep is a great luxury and also a remedy for health many people often compromise on. With this understanding, putting in a bit of effort on the look and feel of what is worn to sleep can make a considerable difference on one’s sleep experience. Conceptualised from the need for stylish yet comfortable sleepwear, Dreamcatcher Sleepwear was founded by mother-daughter duo Ambu Rana and Aayusha Rana Singh. In Nepal, sleepwear has been mostly confined to ill-fitting pieces and worn out clothing that are not necessarily made with the intention of it being sleepwear. Rana and Singh are now trying to change that perception surrounding sleepwear.

 

The Inception of Dreamcatcher

Growing up, Singh was always fascinated with stylish sleepwear. She never missed an opportunity to purchase sleepwear catered to her liking from major brands like ‘H&M’ and “Forever 21’ when she went abroad. However, during her wedding when Singh had to purchase new sets of sleepwear that she would comprise in her wedding trousseau, she realised how difficult it was to find nightwear that was both comfortable and stylish in the Nepalese market. This then led to her considering taking it upon herself to manufacture sleepwear locally.

However, she lacked adequate knowledge on the type of fabrics required and the type of fabrics that would be befitting for sleepwear. She then turned to her mother for help. Rana, who had the required understanding on fabric credits her knowledge to her experience in making clothes for her two children when they were younger. Together, the duo decided to use their individual competences and expertise to run the business.

Thee light-bulb moment then became a business reality when Dreamcatcher Sleepwear was started in November 2016.

 

Business strategies

Besides sleepwear, Dreamcatcher manufactures products like mattresses, sleeping bags and rompers made specially for infants. Rana, composed and detail-oriented, contributes by imparting her knowledge on fabrics, and the material necessities for infant targeted products. Furthermore, Rana also takes care of the secondary stage of production; anything that falls under packaging, manufacturing and finishing is seen through by her. Singh, on the other hand manages sales and marketing strategies. Combined, the duo’s diversity in taste and age brings about variety to the products.  

Under the sleepwear category, Dreamcatcher currently manufactures pyjama sets, robes and separates for both children and adults. The prices start from Rs. 1500 and can go up to Rs. 3500 depending on the type of fabric used, and the product type. Although it is rather significantly priced compared to the orthodox sleepwear, Singh justifies the prices stating, “People often splurge and go all out for outfits that they will probably just wear once, so why hesitate to invest on something that you can wear repetitively and in turn get better sleep experience?”.

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Challenges

According to Singh, Dreamcatcher’s intention is not to cater to a particular market or a niche, but rather focus on providing sleepwear that is timeless and of good quality. Much of their cost constitutes of expensive airfare and rising rates of fabric that they are required to bring in from India. “Don’t get me wrong though, it is not that I don’t want to use fabrics available here. In fact, using fabrics available in Nepal would prove more feasible for me, especially considering the commuting costs. However, the fabric found in Nepal is often too heavy for sleepwear and also not as aesthetically pleasing as we would hope for”, says Singh. She is, however, hopeful of one day, finding better quality fabric appropriate for sleepwear in Nepal.

To overcome the seasonal challenge, Dreamcatcher alternates between the kind of fabrics used in order to make the sleepwear better suited for the climate. For the warmer seasons, they use cotton, and rayon while during the colder seasons, like fall and winter, they have resorted to using heat trapping material like fleece and flannel.

Finding and setting standard sizes, reducing wastage, and the use of traditional equipment are also amongst the constant challenges for Dreamcatcher. They hope that with time and experience, some of these challenges will cease.

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What’s in store for Dreamcatcher?

Currently, Dreamcatcher operates in an order cum delivery model through social media platforms like Instagram and Facebook, but in the near future, they plan on opening a physical outlet too. They have also partnered with other local ventures like The Local Project and Sudrz.com to sell their products. Although young, Dreamcatcher is slowly making its mark by establishing itself as the first designer sleepwear label in Nepal. 

They further aim to use authentic local fabric, cruelty-free fabric and perhaps even organic bamboo fabric. Singh claims that she is someone who gets bored of her tasks easily but in the case of Dreamcatcher, there has never been a time where she has doubted her line of work. She remains optimistic and we wish Dreamcatcher all the best in all their future endeavours.

Comments

  • Guest
    Richa Monday, 07 August 2017

    Fascinating and inspiring article! :)

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Guest Monday, 11 December 2017